Lethal little brother

By Chad Richards

The Uzi. If ever there was, and is, an iconic weapon—even just by its visual impact alone – the Uzi would probably be sitting atop the throne. Compact, dark, with that wicked short barrel and telescoping rear stock…the Uzi evokes deadly dreams of elite commandos, dark hallways and devastating bursts of 9mm bullets.

Of course, these dreams are dated back mostly to the ‘70s and ‘80s, when the Uzi was at its nadir in the real world (who can forget the photo of a Secret Service agent holding an Uzi during the Reagan assassination attempt) and in film, when pictures such as “The Terminator” showed Arnold demanding an “Uzi nine millimeter” from a gun shop owner. Yet the weapon was first introduced in 1954 in Israel by Major Uziel Gal and had been in use during that country’s many conflicts ever since. Although subguns such as the ubiquitous H&K MP5 eventually replaced the Uzi in many militaries, special forces and elite SWAT teams, from the 1960s through the 1980s, more Uzi submachine guns were sold to more military, law enforcement and security markets than any other submachine gun ever made.

THE MINI UZI

With the fantastic success of the full size Uzi, in 1980 Israel Military Industries (IMI) introduced the Mini Uzi. The self-describing names says it all—a lighter, more compact Uzi. With the submachine gun barrel, Mini Uzi with stock extended is 23.6 inches versus 25.5 for a full size Uzi. And when the stock is folded, the Mini Uzi evaporates down to 14.4 inches long versus 17.9 for a its big brother.

Rate of fire was also increased to around 1200rpm, up from 600 on the bigger subgun. The Mini Uzi’s barrel got two small compensating vents at the tip to assist with controlling the weapon during full auto mode.

MINI UZI TODAY

Sadly, owning a full auto Mini Uzi is extremely unlikely for most of us, but the semi-auto carbine version is readily available, either new via clones such as Vector, or at a premium price pre-owned, built by IMI. The semi carbines ship with a 19.8″ barrel and fire from a closed bolt. Shorter barrels are available (where legal) via Green Mountain (www. gmriflebarrel.com) and other companies.

Our Mini Uzi was built by Vector (www.vectorarms. com) on a Group Industries receiver and a modified lower that has Hebrew markings. Vector recommends a 300 round count break-in, during which FTE and FTF can occur due to tight tolerances. Normal FMJ ammo is recommended, not HP, etc. Ours runs flawlessly and eats all types of FMJ ammo. Lets take a look at this unique and deadly little weapon.

Mini Uzi
Mini Uzi

Equipped with a short barrel where legal (this is a dummy barrel—note no compensator vents), the Mini Uzi lives up to its name. Under a standard USGI BDU jacket, the Mini Uzi would be completely concealed. At only 14.4 inches in this config, it also makes an excellent truck gun to tuck behind or under a seat.

Mini Uzi
Mini Uzi

Even with the 19.8-inch barrel installed the Mini Uzi is relatively unobtrusive when slung. The closed-cell foam pipe insulation around the wire stock is a simple trick to improve comfort and feel of cheek weld.

Double stack magazines hold the classic 9×19 Parabellum. NATO ball/ factory FMJ work best in the Mini Uzi.

Mini Uzi
Mini Uzi

Our Lula loader (www. maglula.com) is an excellent mag loader/unloader for Uzi magazines (this one is a German 32-round model). They are fast and easy and we never go shooting without one.

Mini Uzi

Generic forward vertical grip is mounted to a quality TDI/CAA rail that attached via the bayonet lug. Yes, the Uzi and Mini Uzi were designed for bayonets. Charging knob can be seen at top.

Mini Uzi with 25-rd and 32-rd magazines for comparison.

Mini Uzi

We use an original IMI sight adjustment tool for the Mini Uzi, which utilizes the same adjustable front and rear sights as the full size Uzi model B.

Mini Uzi
Mini Uzi

Everything about an Uzi is rugged but simple—they probably learned a thing or two from WW2 Russian guns in this aspect. To change the barrel you simply spin off this barrel nut, the barrel pulls straight out and a new one can be inserted.

Mini Uzi

IMI designed an interesting dual mag arrangement via a small clip that allows two magazines to join in an “L” arrangement. It’s unusual, but the two mags are held extremely securely and mag changes are very fast, giving you 50 or 64 rounds at the gun. Genuine Israeli 5-cell, 25-rd mag pouches on IDF webbing give the operator 250 rounds of 9mm firepower within easy reach.

Mini Uzi

Equipped with the longer carbine barrel, you’ll get good velocity and better long-range accuracy with factory loaded 9mm Parabellum FMJ ammo. The Mini Uzi is shown here with an Israel Military Industries 25-round magazine. 32-round magazines are also readily available.